IMM 101 Survey

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IMM 101 Survey

Survey on Impact Management

This survey is for 10C and Junxion to obtain details of the existing capacity and specific learning needs of the cohort of participants by surveying them on their readiness in adopting the Foundational Practices of the Common Approach to Impact Measurement.
  • 1. PLAN YOUR INTENDED CHANGE

    A common foundation of all impact measurement approaches is a plan for creating the intended change. This plan specifies how, and why, specific activities will bring about change. A diagram — such as a theory of change, outcomes map, or logic model — is often used to illustrate the relationships between actions, performance, and results. The purpose is to focus measurement efforts; to describe the scope of these efforts; and to clarify who should be involved in the process. Be aware of the changes that matter most to stakeholders. Include differing perspectives when defining how and why specific activities will bring about change, and get feedback on any potential unintended results (both positive and negative). By involving stakeholders in planning the intended change, you will uncover differing assumptions, expectations and ideas that give the strongest possible basis for measuring impact.
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  • 2. USE PERFORMANCE MEASURES

    Performance measures, known as indicators, are another common foundation of many impact measurement approaches. They help assess how well work is carried out, and what effects it has. A good set of performance measures will inform how to create impact, and what changes have occurred. Where possible, involve stakeholders in the selection of your performance measures. Involve them in defining what success will look like from their perspective, what criteria or standards they have for judging your performance, and what the priority should be between different indicators. By involving stakeholders, you can ensure the performance indicators you choose closely reflect the results you hope to achieve, and that the basis for measuring your impact is widely accepted.
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  • 3. COLLECT USEFUL INFORMATION

    Gathering and analyzing data can be a resource-intensive task. A common foundation of impact measurement is that the information collected should be useful enough to you to make it worth the effort. This utility derives both from what information is collected, and from how it is collected, and how often. The right combination of those factors helps improve activities, and to demonstrate progress. Where possible, share data collection plans and ask people for their thoughts. Ideally, give stakeholders options about how we will contribute and choose methods that will enable everyone to fully participate regardless of background, confidence or experience. By involving stakeholders, you will ensure the data collected is as full and accurate as possible.
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  • 4. GAUGE PERFORMANCE AND IMPACT

    Whether quantitative or qualitative, no data set makes sense until it is presented in a reasonable and credible context. Implicit in all impact-measurement approaches is the need to assemble and analyze data. Only through this analysis can you gain insights about what works, and about how well you are doing. Involve stakeholders in helping make sense of the information collected. Where possible, bring people together to discuss your findings, review results and explore the reasons behind these. Give them the opportunity to check whether your results are consistent with those originally set out to achieve, and to identify lessons or make recommendations. By involving stakeholders, you can ensure that the information you collect is widely understood and becomes actionable.
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  • 5. REPORT ON RESULTS

    The information collected should be used to produce a balanced account of activities, and the difference they make. This not only helps make better decisions about what to do next; it also allows better communication of achievements clearly and persuasively to others. Accordingly, the method for reporting this evidence is important for showing that the organization is trustworthy and accountable. Report openly and in ways that are appropriate to stakeholders. Take time to consult with different audiences in advance to ensure that reporting methods reflect their needs and preferences. Get feedback to ensure the information presented is clear, user friendly, and useful. Make efforts to ensure that communication becomes a two-way process, using appropriate channels. By reporting regularly and publicly, you will establish trust, transparency, and accountability among stakeholders.
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